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  • Fatal attraction: Brownfield's flexibility doctrine and global drug policy reform

    Martin Jelsma Dave Bewley-Taylor Damon Barrett
    Tuesday, November 18, 2014

    State-level cannabis reforms, which gathered steam this month, have exposed the inability of the United States to abide by the terms of the legal bedrock of the global drug control system; the 1961 Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs. This is something that should force a much-needed conversation about reform to long- standing international agreements. But while ostensibly 'welcoming' the international drug policy reform debate, it is a conversation the US federal government actually wishes to avoid.

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  • Pushing treaty limits?

    Encourage policy makers to rule treaty reform in as an option, rather than presumptively ruling it out
    Wells C. Bennett
    Monday, October 20, 2014

    Suppose the United States government helps to negotiate, and subsequently champions, certain framework treaties – ones justly viewed as imposing significant constraints on all signatories. Down the road, the United States occasionally even calls out counterparties for their looser policy innovations, when the latter push the outer boundaries of what’s permitted under the treaties; a treaty-created monitoring body does likewise in its annual reporting. This pattern essentially holds year in and year out and from one presidential administration to the next.

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  • Colombia, more than three decades of toxic sprayings. Enough!

    Amira Armenta
    Friday, 26 September 2014

    fumigationMamacocaIt is unfortunate that 35 years after the first chemical spraying in the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta, we are still writing about aerial sprayings in Colombia, demanding the current government – how many governments have not happened since! – to definitely defer an ecocide and incompetent policy. Throughout these years we have seen increasing national and international voices opposing the spraying of coca with the herbicide Roundup (glyphosate).

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  • Preparing for the 2016 UNGASS on drugs

    An opportunity we can’t afford to miss
    Nazlee Maghsoudi (IDPC)
    Thursday, July 31, 2014

    The United Nations General Assembly Special Session (UNGASS) on drugs in 2016 is intended to provide states with the opportunity to openly debate the future of international drug policies. An event at UN headquarters in New York discussed precisely what preparations are necessary to make sure the UNGASS accomplishes this objective.

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  • Brazil discusses medical cannabis at international symposium

    Vera da Ros (Rede Brasileira de Redução de Danos e Direitos Humanos - REDUC)
    Wednesday, July 16, 2014

    The IV Symposium on Medicinal Cannabis in Brazil focused on patients who need treatment via medicinal cannabis and its components. Today, these patients struggle with access to such treatment, mainly due to bureaucracy. The event undoubtedly generated attitudes in favor of medical marijuana in the country. However, and unfortunately, less than 10 days after the event ended, National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA) postponed a vote for the reclassification of cannabis.

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  • Mexico legislators consider regulating marijuana to protect human rights

    Zara Snapp
    Monday, July 14, 2014

    In Mexico, since 2006 a public security strategy has been implemented based on militarization, which has prioritized the use of force – including lethal force – based on the presumption of national security above principles of the safety of citizens. Involvement of armed forces as the central axis for Mexico’s security strategy has sparked serious concerns, particularly pertaining to obligations regarding human rights.

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  • Reforming the global drug-control system: The stakes for Washington

    Washington's new narrative defends the integrity of the UN drug control conventions, while allowing more flexible interpretations
    Martin Jelsma
    Friday, June 27, 2014

    The extent to which the ongoing drug-control reforms across the Americas are pushing the boundaries of the global legal framework laid down in three UN drug-control conventions has become a delicate issue. The decriminalization of possession for personal use in several Latin American countries and the establishment of a supervised injection room in Vancouver, Canada have already triggered protracted legal disputes with the International Narcotics Control Board (INCB), the quasi-judicial organ for the conventions’ implementation.

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  • "Just say no" is not an "alternative approach" to the drug problem

    It's been tried – and it doesn't work
    George Murkin (Transform Blog)
    Friday, May 30, 2014

    Dr Hans-Christian Raabe, who was removed from the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs after one month, this week wrote two rather provocative articles on the Conservative Woman website. Raabe’s main argument is that a better, “alternative approach to the drug problem” would be to create a “drug-free society”. Punitive, zero-tolerance, abstinence-based approaches have been the dominant drug policy model in most parts of the world for over half a century now – and they haven’t worked. They've caused a great deal of harm and haven’t really stopped people taking drugs.

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  • Internationaal recht en cannabis

    Rondetafelgesprek coffeeshopbeleid Commissie Veiligheid en Justitie
    Martin Jelsma Tom Blickman
    Donderdag, 15 mei 2014

    Voor het rondetafelgesprek over het rapport: ‘Internationaal recht en cannabis’ op 15 mei 2014 voor de Vaste Commissie voor Veiligheid en Justitie in de Tweede Kamer is het Transnational Institute gevraagd voor een reactie op het rapport Internationaal recht en cannabis van de Radboud Uni­versiteit Nijmegen. Hieronder is de schriftelijke inbreng van TNI te lezen aangevuld met enkele opmerkingen die tijdens het debat werden gemaakt.

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  • The Transnational Institute interviewed by The Hash Marihuana & Hemp Museum

    TNI recently released The Rise and Decline of Cannabis Prohibition

    UN_WienThe Transnational Institute (TNI) released a new report this month called The Rise and Decline of Cannabis Prohibition’. This report will be presented during the 57th UN Commission on Narcotic Drugs (CND) in Vienna. In this article Tom Blickman and Martin Jelsma, who both work for TNI, answer some questions about this report, which is co-financed by the Hash Marihuana & Hemp Museum Amsterdam/Barcelona, one of the sister companies of Sensi Seeds.

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Publications

Countering Illicit and Unregulated Money Flows

Since its beginnings in 1989, the international anti-money laundering regime has not worked as well as intended. After two decades of failed efforts, experts still ponder how to implement one that does work.

TNI Crime & Globalisation Debate Papers, January 2010

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UN Drug Control

In 2011 the 1961 UN Single Convention on drugs will be in place for 50 years. In 2012 the international drug control system will exist 100 years since the International Opium Convention was signed in 1912 in The Hague. Does it still serve its purpose or is a reform of the UN Drug Conventions needed? This site provides critical background.